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Washington University Film & Media Archive

News & Events

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Promotional poster for Eyes on the Prize II

 

 

 

 

Read the Film and Media Archive's blog, Out of the Archive, for all the latest news, activities, and projects.


 

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The Film & Media Archive and Digital Library Services unveil 100+ Hours of Digitized Conversation About the Great Depression

From the stock market crash of 1929 to the beginnings of World War II, The Great Depression tells the dramatic and diverse stories of struggle and survival during the worst economic crisis in U.S. history. Originally debuting on PBS stations in 1993, the 7-part series was met with critical acclaim, winning an Emmy for writing and a duPont-Columbia Award. These interviews are part of the Henry Hampton Collection housed at the Film & Media Archive at Washington University Libraries. Each video and transcript represents the entire interview conducted by Blackside, Inc., including portions that did not appear in the final program. For more information, please contact the Film & Media Archive.


 

Mellon Foundation gives WUSTL $550,000 to preserve Eyes on the Prize

Grant to WUSTL Libraries supports preservation of renowned documentary and interviews on the American civil rights movement.

eyes1_titles-med (64K) Washington University in St. Louis has received a four-year, $550,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to preserve Henry Hampton’s award-winning civil rights documentary Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years, 1954-1965 as well as Hampton’s complete, unedited interviews recorded on film for the documentary. The grant is one of the largest ever received by University Libraries.

For the full press release, click here.


New Online Digital Resource

Eyes on the Prize: The Complete Series

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Eyes on the Prize is a 14-part series which was originally released in two parts in 1985 and 1988. This series, which debuted on PBS stations, is considered to be the definitive documentary on the Civil Rights Movement. Eyes on the Prize won more than twenty major awards and attracted over 20 million viewers. These interviews are part of the Henry Hampton Collection housed at the Film and Media Archive at Washington University Libraries. Each transcript represents the entire interview conducted by Blackside including sections which appeared in the final program and the outtakes. All of the interviews from Eyes on the Prize I and II are available online with full text search capability.This project is part of Washington University's Digital Gateway and was produced by Digital Library Services and the Film and Media Archive.


Past News and Events

RAWSTOCK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Washington University Visual Media Research Lab presents RAWSTOCK, a free archival screening night where anything goes! 

Join us as we unearth the rarest treasures hidden deep within the vaults of Washington University Libraries. From educational films to burlesque acts, there's no telling what we will find!

RAWSTOCK

January 17, 2014 ~ 8 pm

Location:

Melt

2712 Cherokee Street

St. Louis, MO 63118

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home Movie Day - October 26, 2013

St. Louis Central Public Library
1301 Olive Street
St. Louis, MO 63103

Washington University Film & Media Archive and the St. Louis Central Public Library host Home Movie Day, an international event that invites the public to share their Regular 8mm, Super 8mm, 16mm, VHS and DVD home movies. In addition to screening home movies, the event provides an opportunity to learn how to care for home movies.

Home Movie Day in St. Louis is free and will be held at the St. Louis Central Public Library in the Creative Experience room from 1 pm to 3 pm.


Contact the Film & Media Archive (wufilmarchives@wumail.wustl.edu or 314-935-8679) for information about including your home movies in the program. Videos and DVDs are welcome as well.

 

Henry Hampton and Marian Wright Edelman during the filming of her interview for “Eyes on the Prize II”

Please join us for a talk,

Henry Hampton and Eyes on the Prize
by Nadia Ghasedi, Film & Media Archivist
Sunday January 13, 2013
2:00 – 4:00 pm
at The Heights center in Richmond Heights

Nadia Ghasedi, Film & Media Archivist, will present a talk, Henry Hampton and Eyes on the Prize, as part of the centennial celebration of the city of  Richmond Heights. Henry Hampton (1940-98) was a St. Louis native and 1961 graduate of Washington University. In 1968, he established his Boston-based company Blackside, Inc., which quickly became the largest African-American-owned film production company of its time. Hampton’s works chronicle the 20th century’s great political and social movements, focusing on the lives of the poor and disenfranchised.

Best known of Hampton’s 60-plus major film and media projects is the 14-part series Eyes on the Prize which ran in primetime on PBS stations in the 1980s and 1990s. Twenty years after its release it is still considered the definitive work on the Civil Rights Movement. The series garnered international acclaim winning more than 20 major awards and attracting over 20 million viewers. The Boston Globe praised the series as “one of the most distinguished documentary series in the history of broadcasting.” Those sentiments were echoed again whenEyes on the Prize was re-broadcast in the fall of 2006, attracting a new generation of viewers.

All the materials used and created during the making of Eyes on the Prize as well as Blackside’s other works now reside at the Washington University Film & Media. Learn more about Hampton’s legacy and the current preservation of his collection.

In addition an exhibition highlighting Henry Hampton and Eyes on the Prize will be on display at The Heights (8001 Dale Ave., Richmond Heights, MO 63117) for the next month.


National Film Preservation Foundation Grant

Washington University’s Film & Media Archive has been awarded a National Film Preservation Foundation (NFPF) grant to preserve the only known footage of the influential writer, editor, and critic, Ford Madox Ford.

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Ford Madox Ford was one of the most prolific writers and literary critics of the 20th century. He is well-known for his personal and professional associations with legendary writers, such as Joseph Conrad (with whom he collaborated on three novels), Ernest Hemingway, Henry James, Thomas Hardy, H.G. Wells, James Joyce and Ezra Pound, among others. His 1915 novel, The Good Soldier, is often cited by critics as a masterpiece. For example, it is listed in Modern Library’s 100 Best Novels and The Observer included it in their 100 Greatest Novels of All Time.

Ford lived in Paris in the 1920s and in addition to being a writer published an influential journal, The Transatlantic Review. He published numerous writers who would go on to great acclaim including Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, Jean Rhys, and many others. As a writer, Ford used innovative narrative techniques including intricate flashbacks and shifting of time, especially in his acclaimed novel, The Good Soldier.

The George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford consists of images of Mr. Ford enjoying an afternoon with family members and friends on the grounds of Mr. Keating’s home in Plainfield, New Jersey, circa 1929. As the only known footage of Mr. Ford in existence, this rare portrait preserves the legacy of one of the most prolific writers of modernist literature.

The Modern Literature/Manuscripts unit of Washington University Libraries Department of Special Collections also holds a collection of Mr. Ford's papers, including drafts, galleys and correspondence. The preservation and accessibility of the George T. Keating Home Movie featuring Ford Madox Ford will complement these materials as researchers are provided with a more complete representation of Mr. Ford. Without preservation of this film, Mr. Ford only lives on through text-based resources.

The Film & Media Archive will screen the newly preserved film at the 2012 Home Movie Day event. In addition, the film will be screened at an event co-sponsored by the Modern Literature/Manuscripts unit of Special Collections. Scheduled for spring 2013, this event will showcase the film as well as the other Ford materials held by the university. In conjunction with this event, a digital exhibition will be made freely available via the web.  Like all Special Collections events, these events will be free and open to the public.

For a full list of the grants, see the National Film Preservation Foundation’s press release.

Home Movie Day - October 20, 2012

Home Movie Day, Oct. 20, 2012

 

Washington University Film & Media Archive hosts the annual Home Movie Day, an international event that invites the public to share their Regular 8mm, Super 8mm, 16mm, VHS, and DVD home movies, on Saturday, October 20, 2012.

The event will be held at the West Campus Conference Center from noon to 3 p.m. In addition to screening home movies, the event provides an opportunity to learn how to care for home movies. We also encourage people to bring home movies on video or DVD, in addition to film.

Contact the Film & Media Archive (wufilmarchives@wumail.wustl.edu or 314-935-8679) for information about including your home movies in the program.

 

The Dana Brown Collection

An Exhibit - June-December 2012

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An exhibit introducing the recently acquired Dana Brown Collection is now on view at the Film and Media Archive. A small collection of items can be viewed at the Film and Media Archive from June - August 2012. The Archive is open Monday - Friday, 8:30 - 5:00. For more information, please contact us.

Dana Brown was born in West Virginia in 1905. The eleventh of twelve children, Brown left home as a teenager and traveled across America working a variety of jobs, many of them involving manual labor on the railroad, or as a ranch hand, before eventually finding work as a Fuller Brush salesman. By 1946 he was living in St. Louis and working for the General Grocer Co. In 1950 Manhattan Coffee was established as a division of General Grocer and Dana Brown became linked with the product that would help earn his fortune. From the 1950s on he went on a series of journeys and safaris and began documenting his trips with film and audio recordings.

From 1954 to 1990, he went on over 35 trips, and his destinations included the Belgian Congo, Nepal, Sumatra, India, Angola, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Zambia, Vietnam, and many other places. As time went on, he incorporated the footage and audio he captured into commercials and nature films that gave viewers a glimpse of amazing landscapes and animals, and almost always ended with a mention of Safari coffee. Brown eventually left Manhattan Coffee, which had been bought by Nestle, to start his own coffee company and continued to sell Safari coffee. Brown's entrepreneurial success enabled his philanthropy and he gave a $10,000 gift to Children's Hospital in St. Louis in 1985. The trust he established continues to pursue charitable works.

The Dana Brown Collection contains original film and audio material, scripts, and correspondence, including Dana Brown's letters to editors of various publications. Researchers will find a rich source of material in this collection about the cultural history of the mid-to-late twentieth century as well as an environmental record of natural areas throughout Africa and Asia.

 

Talk by Documentary Filmmaker Jon Else
November 18, 2011 – 12 p.m.
Olin Library – Room 142

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The Washington University Film & Media Archive is pleased to welcome producer and documentary filmmaker Jon Else to campus this month. Else is visiting the Archive to conduct research for his forthcoming book about the Eyes on the Prize series and its creator Henry Hampton.

On Friday, Nov. 18, at 12 p.m. in Olin 142, Else will discuss his research and share his experiences working as producer and cinematographer for the Eyes series—arguably the most influential documentary series of its time.

Else has produced and directed numerous documentary films including The Day After Trinity: J. Robert Oppenheimer and the Atomic Bomb, Yosemite: The Fate of Heaven, A Job at Ford’s part of Henry Hampton’s series The Great Depression, Cadillac Desert: Water and the Transformation of Nature, Sing Faster: The Stagehands’ Ring Cycle, and Open Outcry. He has also served as cinematographer on documentaries for PBS, BBC, ABC, MTV, and HBO.

Else has received a MacArthur Fellowship as well as several Academy Award nominations. His numerous awards include four Emmys, several Alfred I. DuPont and Peabody awards, the Prix Italia, the Sundance Special Jury Prize, and the Sundance Filmmaker’s Trophy. In addition to writing and filmmaking, Else teaches at the Graduate School of Journalism at UC – Berkeley.

The Nov. 18 brown bag lunch presentation will take place in Olin 142 and is free and open to faculty, students, staff, and the public. For more information and to RSVP (preferred), contact Film and Media Archive at wufilmarchives@wumail.wustl.edu or 314-935-8679.


The Pruitt-Igoe Myth
Screening at Washington University
November 12, 2011 - 3:00 pm
Washington University – Brown Hall

pruittigoemyth (10K) Washington University Libraries Film & Media Archive is sponsoring a screening of The Pruitt-Igoe Myth as part of the St. Louis International Film Festival. The Film & Media Archive previously co-sponsored a well-attended screening on September 15, 2011.

The screening will be on Sat. Nov. 12, 3:00 p.m. at Washington University’s Brown Hall. With director Chad Freidrichs and several of the film’s subjects. Please join us for a free screening of this thought-provoking documentary.

For more information, contact the Film & Media Archive. For reviews and background information on the film see the filmmaker’s website.


Full Disclosure: A Documentary By Brian Palmer
7:00 PM - October 12, 2011
Wilson Hall 214

Presented with an exhibition of Palmer's photography and journal excerpts in the Grand Staircase Lobby in Olin Library and an exhibit of materials from Special Collections, Documenting War.

Photo by Brian Palmer The Center for the Humanities and University Libraries will host independent journalist and filmmaker Brian Palmer for a presentation of his documentary film, Full Disclosure, at 7 p.m. on Oct. 12 (Wilson 214). The event is free and open to the public, with a reception in Olin Library's Ginkgo Reading Room immediately following the screening.

The film, shot by Palmer during his time as an embedded journalist with a U.S. Marine combat unit in Iraq, concentrates on the daily activities of the American troops and the effects on the troops themselves as well as Iraqi civilians. Palmer made his first trip to Iraq as journalist and photographer in 2004. Armed only with a pen and a camera, he felt that his essays and photographs did not sufficiently capture the experience. So when he returned in 2005 and 2006, he brought a video camera. "I tried to probe deeper into the stories of the Marines and the Iraqi men and women I met," Palmer says. The film also explores the filmmaker's conflicting role as an impartial journalist sometimes mistaken for a Marine.

"My presence affected everyone's behavior. Although I didn't carry a gun, I looked intimidating in my black helmet, desert camouflage bulletproof vest, and combat boots," he says. "Small children cried and ran away if I came too close."

Palmer has written for Mother Jones, The Huffington Post, Pixel Press.org, and ColorLines, among others, and produced video projects for various outlets including PBS and MTV. He is a Fellow at NYU's Center on Law and Security and the recipient of a Nation Institute grant for reporting in Bangladesh in 2010. Palmer received a Ford Foundation Knowledge, Creativity, and Freedom grant in 2008 to complete Full Disclosure. He is an instructor at The School of Visual Arts in New York City and an adjunct instructor at Baruch College, City University of New York.

In conjunction with the screening, an exhibition of Palmer's photography and journal excerpts will be featured in the Grand Staircase Lobby in Olin Library. Also on display will be war-related materials from the Libraries' Department of Special Collections. For more information, contact the Libraries' Film & Media Archive at 314-935-6154.


Home Movie Day - October 15, 2011

hmdflyer-sm-2011 (62K) Washington University Film & Media Archive hosts the annual Home Movie Day, an international event that invites the public to share their Regular 8mm, Super 8mm, and 16mm home movies, on Saturday, October 15, 2011.

The event will be held at the West Campus Conference Center from noon to 3 p.m. In addition to screening home movies, the event provides an opportunity to learn how to care for home movies. We also encourage people to bring home movies on video or DVD, in addition to film.

Contact the Film & Media Archive (wufilmarchives@wumail.wustl.edu or 314-935-8679) for information about including your home movies in the program.






2011 William Miles Prize Winner - Howard Rudnick

William Miles The Film and Media Archive is pleased to announce that the winner of the 2011 Miles Prize is the essay "A Coincidental Cup of Kenyan Coffee: SNCC and Malcolm X Recast the Struggle in Nairobi" by Howard Rudnick. The essay investigates the influence of various African freedom struggles on the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, a major organization in the American Civil Rights Movement.

Howard is a Washington University Graduate who majored in history and economics. His research was directed by Dr. Jean Allman. We offer our congratulations to him on an insightful and well-researched essay.

Sponsored by the Program in African and African-American Studies and by the Film and Media Archive, the Miles Prize honors the life and work of African-American filmmaker William Miles. Essays submitted for the contest must make significant use of materials held by the Film and Media Archive.


Talk by Celia James
Thursday, March 10
4:00pm - 5:00pm
Olin Library, Ginkgo Room

Talk by Celia James, Film and Media Archive Travel Grant recipient, on the impact of images in film on the Civil Rights Movement.

Celia James is a doctoral student in the History Department at the University of South Carolina, where she received her master's in public history and museum education in 2009. She is interested in how visual images are understood by civil rights activists across the 20th century. Her master's thesis examined a 1934 documentary for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, A Study of Educational Inequalities, that compared black and white segregated schools in South Carolina. She is expanding this research further into the 20th century using Washington University's Eyes on the Prize materials.


Premiere of Dana Brown's Life on Safari

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Join HEC-TV and the Film and Media Archive for the premiere of Dana Brown's Life on Safari.

Thursday, December 9
6:30 pm: Documentary Premiere
8 pm: Reception and Meet the Producer

Washington University
Steinberg Auditorium in Steinberg Hall
At the corner of Skinker and Forsyth on the Southeast side of campus.

"This is Safari Land and I am Dana Brown."

With those famous words, coffee entrepreneur and big game hunter Dana Brown invited St. Louis audiences to join him on adventures deep in the African and Asian wilds. Each commercial ran like a mini-documentary, teaching viewers about the animals and the people of faraway places, but always ending with a pitch for coffee. Who is the man behind the bold and adventurous public persona? Join HEC-TV as we premiere Dana Brown's Life on Safari and find out.

View the invitation. (pdf)


Home Movie Day - October 16, 2010

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Washington University Film & Media Archive hosts the annual Home Movie Day, an international event that invites the public to share their Regular 8mm, Super 8mm, and 16mm home movies, on Saturday, October 16, 2010. The event will be held at the West Campus Conference Center from noon to 4 p.m. In addition to screening home movies, the event provides an opportunity to learn how to care for home movies.

Contact the Film & Media Archive (wufilmarchives@wumail.wustl.edu or 314-935-8679) for information about including your home movies in the program.


Lecture and Book Signing with Eric Greitens

You are invited to a lecture and book signing by Rhodes Scholar and Navy Seal, Eric Greitens, in conjunction with the opening of a special exhibition of a selection of images from Eric's award-winning book, Strength & Compassion. For more information about Eric Greitens and his book, combining international humanitarian photography work with a striking series of essays, see http://www.ericgreitens.com

Date: Tuesday, November 3, 2009
Time: 5:30 - 7:30 pm
Location:
Olin Library
Lecture: Room 142
Exhibition and book signing: Ginkgo Reading Room

The exhibition seeks to educate communities about the impact of genocide and demonstrates what we can learn from survivors who have lived through some of the world's most horrific circumstances.

This event is free and open to the public; copies of the book will be available for purchase.

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William Miles Prize Reception

Friday, May 1st
5:00 pm, Room 142, Olin Library

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You are invited to the William Miles Prize Reception on Friday, May 1st at 5 pm in the Room 142, Olin Library. The William Miles Prize honors student essays that draw upon materials from the Film and Media Archive.

This prize honors the life and work of filmmaker William Miles, who chronicled the achievements of African Americans in documentaries such as I Remember Harlem and Men of Bronze. The Washington University Film and Media Archive houses the William Miles Collection. In partnership with the African & African American Studies Program, the Archive will award a graduate prize of $500 and an undergraduate prize of $500 to outstanding essays, or other serious research projects, that make significant use of rare or unique materials from the archive.

For Contest Details click here. (pdf)
The prize in both categories is $500.
Deadline: April 1, 2009
Co-sponsored by the Film and Media Archive and the African American Studies Program.


New YouTube Channel

The Film and Media Archive has created a YouTube Channel. Click the link to view selected videos.


The Film and Media Archive has created a new blog, Out of the Archive. Entries will cover news, activities, and information about materials in the Film Archive.


Click here for a complete archive of older events.